Time for a new era for teaching and teacher education

By Tom Perry, Lecturer School of Education, University of Birmingham “Now is the time to rally behind and support the already-brilliant teachers we have and ensure all have the resources and support they need to nurture, educate and inspire. No one benefits from burnt out, vilified, and poorly-supported teachers in the cross-fire of political and … Continue reading “Time for a new era for teaching and teacher education”

Published: Posted on

An examination system fit for purpose in the Covid-19 era? Time for real system leadership in education.

By Colin Diamond CBE, Professor of Education Leadership School of Education, University of Birmingham “There is no guarantee that those students about to enter the final year of A level and GCSE studies will have a smooth ride. Partial school closures appear likely and reliance on a 100% final examination is as fanciful as imagining … Continue reading “An examination system fit for purpose in the Covid-19 era? Time for real system leadership in education.”

Published: Posted on

Mental health social care and COVID-19: Learning from the present and preparing for the future

By Dr Sarah Carr, Senior Fellow in Mental Health Policy Department of Social Work and Social Care and the Institute for Mental Health, University of Birmingham. “Many mental health social care service users experience profound inequalities. Evidence is showing us that the most socio-economically marginalised have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19.” In their recent blog … Continue reading “Mental health social care and COVID-19: Learning from the present and preparing for the future”

Published: Posted on

Beneath the headlines: Are the older generation paying the price for neglect of social care?

By Dr Denise Tanner, Senior Lecturer in Social Work Department of Social Work and Social Care, University of Birmingham. “We need to recognise that beneath the headlines of the neglect of social care and the neglect of social care workers lies another neglect – that of older people.” Pre Covid-19 and the outlook for adult … Continue reading “Beneath the headlines: Are the older generation paying the price for neglect of social care?”

Published: Posted on

What might happen to charitable giving in the forthcoming recession?

By Professor John Mohan, Director of the Third Sector Research Centre, School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham. “At a time when there are great expectations of what voluntary organisations can deliver, the prospect is one of a significant reduction in resources with highly differentiated effects that, in turn, will affect the capacity of those … Continue reading “What might happen to charitable giving in the forthcoming recession?”

Published: Posted on

The neglect of adult social care during covid-19

By Jon Glasby, Professor of Heath and Social Care and Catherine Needham, Professor of Public Policy and Public Management, School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham. “If any good is to come from such tragedy, we must renew our efforts to achieve a lasting settlement for social care, understanding and valuing it in its own … Continue reading “The neglect of adult social care during covid-19”

Published: Posted on

Sexual and other forms of violence during the COVID-19 pandemic in Kenya

By Sarah Rockowitz (MSc Health Policy, MSc Public Health) Global Challenges PhD Scholar in School of Psychology and School of Nursing, University of Birmingham. “The research found that children, particularly girls, have heightened vulnerability to sexual violence committed by non-stranger perpetrators (e.g. neighbours) at private residences during the daytime, owing to school closures and a … Continue reading “Sexual and other forms of violence during the COVID-19 pandemic in Kenya”

Published: Posted on

Livelihoods on the line: Support needed for independent musicians and grass-roots venues

By Dr David White, Lecturer in Political Science School of Government, University of Birmingham. “It is not yet clear how the £1.5bn rescue package for the arts, promised by the government on 6th July, will be spent. For the musicians I spoke to the main concern was for the future of the smaller grass-roots live … Continue reading “Livelihoods on the line: Support needed for independent musicians and grass-roots venues”

Published: Posted on

Why Dogs Might Help us through the Covid-19 Crisis

By Dr Alison Broad, Director of Primary Initial Teacher Education School of Education, University of Birmingham. On March 11th 2020, The World Health Organisation declared covid-19 a worldwide pandemic. As the UK retreated into lockdown, for many of us our normal lives were changed in an instant. A very recent study, has looked at the … Continue reading “Why Dogs Might Help us through the Covid-19 Crisis”

Published: Posted on

Festivals cancelled: the substantial impact on local people and communities

By Dr David White, Lecturer in Political Science School of Government, University of Birmingham. “The UK’s music festival industry not only fosters artistic talent, provides opportunities for people to gain experience in a range of roles, and creates a much-needed sense of wellbeing for those that attend, it also makes significant contributions to the British … Continue reading “Festivals cancelled: the substantial impact on local people and communities”

Published: Posted on