Trumpian Diplomacy and UK-US Relations

By Professor David Dunn, Professor in International Politics Department of Political Science and International Studies, University of Birmingham For Trump, however, both at the NATO summit in Brussels and in his criticism of the May government in The Sun, the apparent intention was to challenge the value of continued partnership; to chastise allies for their … Continue reading “Trumpian Diplomacy and UK-US Relations”

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Fake bonding? Will Trump and Putin’s Helsinki meeting replay Singapore?

By Nicholas Wheeler,  Professor  of International Relations Department of Political Science and International Studies, University of Birmingham Professor Marcus Holmes, The College of William and Mary If Helsinki achieves this, or at least paves the way to an eventual agreement, then Trump will have some claim that he has forged a personal bond with Putin that … Continue reading “Fake bonding? Will Trump and Putin’s Helsinki meeting replay Singapore?”

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Racial displacements: learning (from) the city

By Dr Giovanni Picker, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Senior Researcher Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology, University of Birmingham Forced displaced populations, whether urban or global, are often racialised subjects viewed as less deserving  Understanding global inequalities is no easy task. While income, wealth and gender (i.e. sex at birth) are measurable data, race and ethnicity are … Continue reading “Racial displacements: learning (from) the city”

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VIDEO AND PODCAST: What does it mean to be British?

The 22 June marks 70 years since the arrival of the Empire Windrush at Tilbury docks. The ‘sons of the Empire’ came not as immigrants, but as British subjects exercising a form of “freedom of movement” within the borders of the British territories. But as we fast forward to today, three generations later, the Windrush scandal … Continue reading “VIDEO AND PODCAST: What does it mean to be British?”

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On not helping refugees

By Rachel Humphris, Lecturer Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology, University of Birmingham Refugee Week offers us the opportunity to reflect on the ways that we can better support refugees. For me, there are three critical points to consider when looking at how we can welcome and help those often badged as ‘others’: Why … Continue reading “On not helping refugees”

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Volcano eruption in Guatemala – a tale of natural and political disasters

By Dr Sanne Weber,  Research Fellow International Development Department, University of Birmingham The eruption of the volcano ‘Fuego’ (Fire) in Guatemala last Sunday and the government’s response to it laid bare once again the severe social and political crisis in the country, the result of years of corruption, social and political conflict. The eruption flooded … Continue reading “Volcano eruption in Guatemala – a tale of natural and political disasters”

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Good Girls VS Bad Girls: exploring the representations of female sexuality on ITV’s Love Island

By Amelia Morris,  PhD Doctoral Researcher Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Birmingham Overall, it is important to analyse reality TV’s representations of femininity and sexuality; shows such as Love Island exist within the mainstream and draw in large audiences.  Thus, conversations surrounding gender and sexuality can be amplified through such shows in … Continue reading “Good Girls VS Bad Girls: exploring the representations of female sexuality on ITV’s Love Island”

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Why do people volunteer for international development organisations?

By David Hudson, Professorial Research Fellow in Politics and Development International Development Department, University of Birmingham Who are these people who give their time, and work with and for international development organisations? People become engaged with international development in lots of different ways and for many different reasons. Some people donate to a charity because … Continue reading “Why do people volunteer for international development organisations?”

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Raising taxes to fund the NHS: are we (and the NHS) ready to grasp the nettle?

By Judith Smith , Professor of Health Policy and Management Director of Health Services Management Centre School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham ‘Tax rises needed to prevent NHS misery’. This was the stark warning from the BBC recently, reacting to new analysis by the Health Foundation and Institute for Fiscal Studies that suggests that … Continue reading “Raising taxes to fund the NHS: are we (and the NHS) ready to grasp the nettle?”

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What do World Hunger Day, immigration control and a former national airline have in common?

By Andrew Jolly, Doctoral Researcher School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham Food poverty is a pressing global issue, there are an estimated 815 million people in the world today who are chronically undernourished and eradicating the issue of world hunger is one of the UN sustainable development goals. The Food Standards Agency estimates that … Continue reading “What do World Hunger Day, immigration control and a former national airline have in common?”

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