Trump could learn a lesson or two from Bush on “Fake News”

By Christopher Featherstone, Doctoral Researcher, Department of Political Science and International Studies School of Government & Society, University of Birmingham Fake news, as defined by the Cambridge Dictionary, can be “false stories that appear to be news, spread on the internet or using other media, usually created to influence political views or as a joke.” … Continue reading “Trump could learn a lesson or two from Bush on “Fake News””

New Refugee Integration Indicators for the UK and Beyond

By Professor Jenny Phillimore, Department of Social Policy, Sociology & Criminology  School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham 2017 saw the highest number of displaced people ever at 68.5m (UNHCR 2018) – therefore it is no surprise that interest in refugee integration continues to increase. The arrival of refugees in Europe in 2015 generated much … Continue reading “New Refugee Integration Indicators for the UK and Beyond”

What can Line of Duty tell us about corruption?

Professor Heather Marquette, International Development School of Government & Society, University of Birmingham Like over 10 million people in the UK, I have been glued to my tv for the past six Sunday evenings for Line of Duty season five. Since 2012, Superintendent Ted Hastings, DI Kate Fleming and DS Steve Arnott from the fictional … Continue reading “What can Line of Duty tell us about corruption?”

How to bridge the gap between theory, research and what’s unravelling in the everyday life of individuals with autism?

Dr Lila Kossyvaki Department of Disability Inclusion and Special Needs (DISN), School of Education, University of Birmingham April is the month when autism comes to the forefront and many people work on raising awareness. Although, beyond any doubt autism should be visible all year long, establishing international days or longer periods of time to mark … Continue reading “How to bridge the gap between theory, research and what’s unravelling in the everyday life of individuals with autism?”

Asking artists to take a look at the ‘man in the mirror’

By Aidan Thompson, Director of Strategic Initiatives The Jubilee Centre for Character & Virtues, University of Birmingham Can an artist produce ‘good’ art and not be a ‘good’ person? Does it matter whether they are ‘good’ or not? Are the definitions of ‘good’ even comparable? And who gets to determine what ‘good’ means? Definitions of … Continue reading “Asking artists to take a look at the ‘man in the mirror’”

NHS Long Term Plan does not provide enough for LGBTQ young people

By Dr Jason Schaub, Lecturer in Social Work Department of Social Work and Social Care, University of Birmingham The 7th January saw the launch of the new NHS Long Term Plan (NHS, 2018). It was surprising that this Plan included only a single mention of LGBTQ people. It correctly identifies that there are particular concerns about LGBTQ … Continue reading “NHS Long Term Plan does not provide enough for LGBTQ young people”

How can we beat Blue Monday?

By Maureen Smojkis, Lecturer in Mental Health Department of Social Work and Social Care, University of Birmingham A combination of post-Christmas blues, cold dark nights and the arrival of unpaid credit card bills have contributed to the third Monday in January being awarded the title of Blue Monday – so what can we do to tackle the … Continue reading “How can we beat Blue Monday?”

Why there’s a case for giving foreign aid to authoritarian regimes

By Nic Cheeseman, Professor of Democracy and International Development International Development Department, University of Birmingham Should democracies give foreign aid to countries that are not democracies? Democratic aid donors don’t have enough money to do all the things they want to in the world, so they need to find ways to decide how to ration aid. … Continue reading “Why there’s a case for giving foreign aid to authoritarian regimes”

How is Gatwick Airport vulnerable to drones?

By Professor David Dunn, Professor in International Politics Department of Political Science and International Studies, University of Birmingham The recent events at Gatwick Airport show how vulnerable airport infrastructure is from the fast-evolving and disruptive technology of unmanned drones. This vulnerability carries with it the risk of accident and injury or even loss of life. Over … Continue reading “How is Gatwick Airport vulnerable to drones?”

‘A time for giving’ – what to think about when making a charitable donation at Christmas

By Professor Paul Montgomery, Professor of Social Intervention and Doctoral Researcher, Caroline Greenhalgh School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham At this time of year, many of us will be thinking about giving money to Charity. In fact, donations peak in December and last year 37% of households made donations to charities in the last month … Continue reading “‘A time for giving’ – what to think about when making a charitable donation at Christmas”