It was feminicide: naming Sarah Everard’s murder

By Dr Melany Cruz , Teaching Fellow,  Department of Political Science and International Studies, University of Birmingham. “The importance of naming violence not only permits us to make a distinction in the law but invites us to reflect on the foundation of individualised experiences of violence.” Sarah Everard’s disappearance and murder by a Metropolitan Police … Continue reading “It was feminicide: naming Sarah Everard’s murder”

The challenges and unexpected benefits for families with children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) during lockdown

By Natalie Reardon, Alumna and Deputy Head Teacher and SENCo at Mill School, Bury – an independent specialist provision for Pupils aged 7-17 with Autism Spectrum Condition. Reflections on lockdown SEND education has been impacted over the last 12 months as a result of the repeated lockdowns in response to the global pandemic. For many … Continue reading “The challenges and unexpected benefits for families with children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) during lockdown”

Could a census campaign help to reverse Brexit? Don’t count on it.

By Dr Laurence Cooley, School of Government, University of Birmingham. With the decennial census of England and Wales scheduled for Sunday 21 March, a growing number of dissatisfied EU referendum ‘remain’ voters are taking to social media to declare their intention to answer the question on national identity by writing in ‘European’. These posts have … Continue reading “Could a census campaign help to reverse Brexit? Don’t count on it.”

The NHS White Paper: evolution or revolution?

By Professor Judith Smith, Director of Health Services Management Centre and Professor Robin Miller, Head of Department, Social Work and Social Care, University of Birmingham.  NHS White Papers seem to fall into two categories.  First, landmark ones that signal major change of direction and upheaval (can you remember where you were when you heard about … Continue reading “The NHS White Paper: evolution or revolution?”

The importance of looking beyond political literacy for Generation Z

By Andrew Peterson, Professor of Character and Citizenship Education and Deputy Director of the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, University of Birmingham.  “It is civic character that enables young people to develop the sense of purpose and intent so important to meaningful political engagement and which, in turn, helps them to understand and reflect … Continue reading “The importance of looking beyond political literacy for Generation Z”

Inspire a world of imagination this National Storytelling Week

By Dr Nicola Smith, Lecturer in Primary and Early Years Education and Laura Martin, Alumni Relations Manager School of Education, University of Birmingham After extended school closures continue due to Coronavirus, there is evidence to show that many older primary and secondary school children have lost their ‘reading stamina’ without the daily reading practice that … Continue reading “Inspire a world of imagination this National Storytelling Week”

President Biden’s first 100 days

By Christopher Featherstone, Doctoral Researcher, POLSIS, School of Government, University of Birmingham. President Biden’s path to his inauguration was very rocky and made history for the wrong reasons. Now he has made it to the White House, he faces more challenges, particularly in his first 100 days. COVID-19 No President wants to enter office during … Continue reading “President Biden’s first 100 days”

Read Grow Go: Discover the wonder of literature with the Jubilee Centre

By Catherine O’Leary, Research Fellow Jubilee Centre for Character & Virtues, University of Birmingham As we face another period of time where many children across the nation are not in school, let’s take this opportunity to reflect back to The National Literacy Trust survey that took place in 2020. The survey determined the impact that the … Continue reading “Read Grow Go: Discover the wonder of literature with the Jubilee Centre”

Playing with Fire and Fish? No-Deal and the Wider Impacts for the EU and the UK

By Professor John Bryson Department of Strategy and International Business, University of Birmingham I have spent many days in Brussels working with the European Commission providing advice that shaped European policy outcomes. This included working on the Services Directives, service innovation policy and services and trade negotiations. Trade negotiations are complex. Each partner to the … Continue reading “Playing with Fire and Fish? No-Deal and the Wider Impacts for the EU and the UK”

Migration – A Personal Story

By Steve Gulati, Senior Fellow, Health Services Management Centre, University of Birmingham As the world observes International Migrants Day (18th December 2020), I found myself thinking about my own story and experiences, both personal and professional. In this extended piece, I reflect on the experiences of me and my family, as first and second generation … Continue reading “Migration – A Personal Story”