Are the planned cuts to UKHSA and expenditures to control COVID-19 warranted?

By Professor Aditya Goenka, Chair in Economics, Department of Economics The Covid-19 pandemic started more than 2 years ago. With over 86% of the UK population vaccinated twice, 68% boosted, and seven-day average deaths below 300 it would seem time that the country moved on from Covid restrictions. In February 2021 the UK Government published … Continue reading “Are the planned cuts to UKHSA and expenditures to control COVID-19 warranted?”

Off-Rolling: What is it, and why does DfE guidance continue to not address it?

By Megan Whitehouse, School of Education Off-rolling describes the process whereby a pupil is illegally excluded from their school. This process can take many forms, however the most commonly reported examples involve a child being sent home to ‘cool off’, or a parent being coerced into educating their child at home in an attempt to … Continue reading “Off-Rolling: What is it, and why does DfE guidance continue to not address it?”

Safeguarding children of colour in White institutions

By Dr Saba Hussain, Assistant Professor in Education, Department of Education & Social Justice Even ‘safe’ spaces such as schools are not safe for racialised children. Being pinned down to the table, handcuffed and accusations of ‘smelling like marijuana’ are not experiences one would normally associate with school going children. However, some of the accounts … Continue reading “Safeguarding children of colour in White institutions”

Transgender Day of Visibility 2022: Visibility with a price

By Dr Charlotte Galpin and Dr Ash Stokoe, University of Birmingham, and Dr Gina Gwenffrewi, University of Edinburgh “We are living in a time of trans visibility. Yet we are also living in a time of anti-trans violence.” (Gossett, Stanley and Burton in Trap Door, 2017) Transgender Day of Visibility (TDOV) takes place on 31st … Continue reading “Transgender Day of Visibility 2022: Visibility with a price”

Upheaval in Pakistan’s Politics: Will Imran Khan survive?

By Umer Karim, Doctoral Researcher in the Department of Political Science and International Studies, University of Birmingham The election of Imran Khan as the Prime Minister of Pakistan in 2018 heralded some new trends in Pakistani politics. Imran Khan became the first person after former Premier Zulfiqar Bhutto to land into power through the sheer … Continue reading “Upheaval in Pakistan’s Politics: Will Imran Khan survive?”

Eton partnerships will create opportunities in communities that need them, but they won’t level up education as a whole

By Professor Chris Millward, Professor of Practice in Education Policy, School of Education Early in 2020, a renowned public school asked me a difficult and unexpected question.  It was difficult because it pitched the interests of individuals against the communities in which they live.  It was unexpected because the school was one of eight from … Continue reading “Eton partnerships will create opportunities in communities that need them, but they won’t level up education as a whole”

Cyberflashing: When indecent exposure goes online

By Dr Sophie King-Hill, Senior Fellow, Health Services Management Centre The UK government is cracking down in ‘cyberflashing’ by including it as an offence with up to two years imprisonment in its new Online Safety Bill. This forms part of a larger scale initiative to keep people safe on the internet. The term ‘cyberflashing’ refers … Continue reading “Cyberflashing: When indecent exposure goes online”

Ukrainian refugee sponsorship: an opportunity for all refugees?

By Professor Jenny Phillimore, Professor of Migration and Superdiversity, Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology With the advent of a sponsorship programme for Ukrainian refugees, several media outlets have been at pains to point out the slow take up of the UK’s existing Community Sponsorship Scheme.  Around 700 refugees have arrived via this scheme … Continue reading “Ukrainian refugee sponsorship: an opportunity for all refugees?”

Building Character and Resilience into Global Education’s Post-Pandemic Recovery

By Ben Perks UNICEF Head of Campaigns and Advocacy and Honorary Senior Research Fellow with the Jubilee Centre 100 weeks of pandemic have cost more than a trillion hours of learning loss. The pre-pandemic out of school population of 9% has grown significantly. Learning inequality worsened in the UK and US. In the city of Wall … Continue reading “Building Character and Resilience into Global Education’s Post-Pandemic Recovery”

LGBTQ+ History Month 2022: “Gays count; count gays” – LGBTQ+ activism and the census

By Dr Laurence CooleyDepartment of Political Science and International Studies, University of Birmingham In March 2021, people in England, Wales and Northern Ireland became the first in the world to be asked a question about sexual orientation in a national census (Scotland’s census having been delayed by a year). This was a historic moment, accompanied … Continue reading “LGBTQ+ History Month 2022: “Gays count; count gays” – LGBTQ+ activism and the census”