Why compulsory voting alone can’t fix a broken political system

Dr Susan Dodsworth, International Development Department School of Government and Society, University of Birmingham This Saturday, Australians – myself among them – will vote in a federal election. As in previous elections, voter turnout is expected to exceed 90%, in part because Australia is one of a handful of countries to enforce compulsory voting. Whenever … Continue reading “Why compulsory voting alone can’t fix a broken political system”

Is the British economy facing ‘troubled times’?

By Professor Aditya Goenka Department of Economics, University of Birmingham “Troubled times had come to my hometown” (Springsteen, 1986) Since the Brexit vote in June 2016, the British economy has been slowing down, with the growth rate in the last quarter of 2018 at just 0.2%, the slowest since 2012. This should be seen in the … Continue reading “Is the British economy facing ‘troubled times’?”

Racial displacements: learning (from) the city

By Dr Giovanni Picker, Marie Skłodowska-Curie Senior Researcher Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology, University of Birmingham Forced displaced populations, whether urban or global, are often racialised subjects viewed as less deserving  Understanding global inequalities is no easy task. While income, wealth and gender (i.e. sex at birth) are measurable data, race and ethnicity are … Continue reading “Racial displacements: learning (from) the city”

On not helping refugees

By Rachel Humphris, Lecturer Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology, University of Birmingham Refugee Week offers us the opportunity to reflect on the ways that we can better support refugees. For me, there are three critical points to consider when looking at how we can welcome and help those often badged as ‘others’: Why … Continue reading “On not helping refugees”

Taking responsibility for our prisons: lessons to be learnt from Norway

By Dr Anna Kotova, Lecturer in Criminology Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology, University of Birmingham Only about 25% of former prisoners in England and Wales are in employment after release, as per the government’s 2016 figures [ii]. About half of employers would not consider employing someone who had been to prison [iii]. In a recent … Continue reading “Taking responsibility for our prisons: lessons to be learnt from Norway”

20 Years since the Good Friday Agreement: What we can learn from Northern Ireland’s Peace Process

By Dr Giuditta Fontana, Leverhulme Fellow Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security (ICCS), University of Birmingham On 10th of April 2018, former negotiators gathered to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement. The Agreement put an end to three decades of what are known as Northern Ireland’s ‘Troubles’, which resulted in over 3,500 deaths … Continue reading “20 Years since the Good Friday Agreement: What we can learn from Northern Ireland’s Peace Process”