HS2 Funds Reallocation: A Lifeline or Liability for Local Authorities?

Dr Alice Moore, Assistant Professor in Public Management and Public Policy – School of Government The government has reallocated £4.7 billion that it would have spent on the cancelled legs of HS2 to a Local Transport Fund. From 2025, 27 areas in the North of England and Midlands will get an allocation to spend on … Continue reading “HS2 Funds Reallocation: A Lifeline or Liability for Local Authorities?”

Why a ‘no man’s land’ employment status fuels gig worker unrest

By Professor Tony Dobbins Professor of Work and Employment Relations, Birmingham Business School, University of Birmingham Employment relations between delivery riders and platform employers Deliveroo, Uber Eats and Just Eats on Valentine’s Day, February 14th, 2024, were distinctly unromantic. Delivery riders providing services to these digital online platform employers held a mass withdrawal of labour … Continue reading “Why a ‘no man’s land’ employment status fuels gig worker unrest”

The Autumn Statement or a New Political Game in Spotting the Politics of Tokenism

By Professor John Bryson Professor of Enterprise and Economic Geography, Birmingham Business School In 1777, Samuel Johnson proclaimed to James Boswell, his friend and biographer, “When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life”. I must admit to being tired of Autumn Statements and of a British political system that is not … Continue reading “The Autumn Statement or a New Political Game in Spotting the Politics of Tokenism”

Reflections on the King’s Speech

King Charles has opened parliament for the first time as monarch in the first King’s Speech in more than 70 years. Academics from across the College of Social Science reflect on the government’s key priorities set out by the king. Crime & Justice Proposals for tougher sentences raise concerns about exacerbating the strain on an … Continue reading “Reflections on the King’s Speech”

Why offices must adapt to encourage people to return

By Hannes Read, Policy and Data Analyst City-REDI, University of Birmingham “People who tend to have more outgoing and extroverted personalities may be more likely to feel encouraged by more opportunities to network. Yet those who are less outgoing could feel that their wellbeing is best placed by working predominantly from home.” A new study … Continue reading “Why offices must adapt to encourage people to return”

Departing Stores: The demise of a 200-year-old retail format

By Dr Inci Toral, Department of Marketing Birmingham Business School, University of Birmingham. “…a global pandemic situation is not the only factor to blame. It is, in fact a multifaceted phenomenon that the Covid-19 only accelerated the demise of the 200-year-old retail formats.” As we are entering the new phase of returning to normal and … Continue reading “Departing Stores: The demise of a 200-year-old retail format”

Brexit and Social Security for British People Living in the EU

By Dr Kelly Hall, Senior Lecturer in Social Policy, School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham After years of uncertainty, the UK has now left the EU. So what does this mean for more than a million British people living in other European countries? The UK is now considered a ‘third country’ to the EU … Continue reading “Brexit and Social Security for British People Living in the EU”

The scramble for Covid-19 vaccines- Is there enough for everyone?

By Professor Aditya Goenka,  The Department of Economics, University of Birmingham. “Canada has orders for enough vaccines to inoculate its population six times over, UK four times over, and EU about twice. The constraints on how fast vaccines can be produced… and stockpiling by richer Western countries raises the possibility that LMICs will be left … Continue reading “The scramble for Covid-19 vaccines- Is there enough for everyone?”

What might happen to charitable giving in the forthcoming recession?

By Professor John Mohan, Director of the Third Sector Research Centre, School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham. “At a time when there are great expectations of what voluntary organisations can deliver, the prospect is one of a significant reduction in resources with highly differentiated effects that, in turn, will affect the capacity of those … Continue reading “What might happen to charitable giving in the forthcoming recession?”

What does the 2020 Budget mean for health and social care?

By Professor Judith Smith, Director of Health Services Management Centre School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham For the NHS, there were in effect two Budgets: one for the short-to-medium-term to address the Coronavirus crisis, and the other to continue with the previously announced five-year investment in the NHS to enable it to meet its … Continue reading “What does the 2020 Budget mean for health and social care?”