Departing Stores: The demise of a 200-year-old retail format

By Dr Inci Toral, Department of Marketing Birmingham Business School, University of Birmingham. “…a global pandemic situation is not the only factor to blame. It is, in fact a multifaceted phenomenon that the Covid-19 only accelerated the demise of the 200-year-old retail formats.” As we are entering the new phase of returning to normal and … Continue reading “Departing Stores: The demise of a 200-year-old retail format”

Brexit and Social Security for British People Living in the EU

By Dr Kelly Hall, Senior Lecturer in Social Policy, School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham After years of uncertainty, the UK has now left the EU. So what does this mean for more than a million British people living in other European countries? The UK is now considered a ‘third country’ to the EU … Continue reading “Brexit and Social Security for British People Living in the EU”

The scramble for Covid-19 vaccines- Is there enough for everyone?

By Professor Aditya Goenka,  The Department of Economics, University of Birmingham. “Canada has orders for enough vaccines to inoculate its population six times over, UK four times over, and EU about twice. The constraints on how fast vaccines can be produced… and stockpiling by richer Western countries raises the possibility that LMICs will be left … Continue reading “The scramble for Covid-19 vaccines- Is there enough for everyone?”

What might happen to charitable giving in the forthcoming recession?

By Professor John Mohan, Director of the Third Sector Research Centre, School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham. “At a time when there are great expectations of what voluntary organisations can deliver, the prospect is one of a significant reduction in resources with highly differentiated effects that, in turn, will affect the capacity of those … Continue reading “What might happen to charitable giving in the forthcoming recession?”

What does the 2020 Budget mean for health and social care?

By Professor Judith Smith, Director of Health Services Management Centre School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham For the NHS, there were in effect two Budgets: one for the short-to-medium-term to address the Coronavirus crisis, and the other to continue with the previously announced five-year investment in the NHS to enable it to meet its … Continue reading “What does the 2020 Budget mean for health and social care?”

Is the British economy facing ‘troubled times’?

By Professor Aditya Goenka Department of Economics, University of Birmingham “Troubled times had come to my hometown” (Springsteen, 1986) Since the Brexit vote in June 2016, the British economy has been slowing down, with the growth rate in the last quarter of 2018 at just 0.2%, the slowest since 2012. This should be seen in the … Continue reading “Is the British economy facing ‘troubled times’?”

Budget 2018 and the NHS: the gauntlet has been thrown

By Judith Smith, Professor of Health Policy and Management Director of Health Services Management Centre, University of Birmingham In June, the Prime Minister gave the NHS what appeared to be a very generous 70th birthday present  – the promise of a new long-term funding settlement worth an extra £20.5 billion a year by 2023-24. When set alongside other … Continue reading “Budget 2018 and the NHS: the gauntlet has been thrown”

Raising taxes to fund the NHS: are we (and the NHS) ready to grasp the nettle?

By Judith Smith , Professor of Health Policy and Management Director of Health Services Management Centre School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham ‘Tax rises needed to prevent NHS misery’. This was the stark warning from the BBC recently, reacting to new analysis by the Health Foundation and Institute for Fiscal Studies that suggests that … Continue reading “Raising taxes to fund the NHS: are we (and the NHS) ready to grasp the nettle?”