Putting it Simply: What is the Good Friday Agreement?

By Professor Joanne Murphy Department of Management The Good Friday or Belfast Agreement of April 10th 1998, is an international Treaty signed by the British and Irish Governments and is generally regarded to have brought about an end to the long-running conflict in Northern Ireland known as ‘the Troubles’. The Agreement was the culmination of … Continue reading “Putting it Simply: What is the Good Friday Agreement?”

Reflections on the 2023 Spring Budget: expert opinions

Nearly two weeks on from the Spring Budget announcement, we’re looking back on the policy changes, responses, and how they will affect you. Support for energy bills “The Chancellor has announced that the energy price guarantee will remain unchanged at £2,500 until June 2023. In the meantime, the household winter discount of £400 on energy … Continue reading “Reflections on the 2023 Spring Budget: expert opinions”

Why SVB’s bankruptcy isn’t surprising

By Dr Huw MacartneyDepartment of Political Science and International Studies, University of Birmingham Edited version of an article originally published on iai We’re asking the wrong kind of questions surrounding the collapse of Silicon Valley Bank. Five main issues have emerged thus far: business models; stability; moral hazard; regulation; and tightening. But without considering the … Continue reading “Why SVB’s bankruptcy isn’t surprising”

The Energy Price Cap and Price Guarantee: What does it mean for your energy bill?

By Dr Annum RafiqueCity Region Economic and Development Institute, University of Birmingham The energy price cap sets a maximum price that energy suppliers can charge consumers for each kilowatt hour (kWh) of energy they use. The price cap is for those customers who do not shop around for tariffs and are using default energy tariffs … Continue reading “The Energy Price Cap and Price Guarantee: What does it mean for your energy bill?”

ChatGPT in education: how much work should we outsource to AI?

By Dr Adam MatthewsSchool of Education OpenAI’s ChatGPT uses machine learning to capture swathes of internet texts to create content which is capable of human-like responses to questions and follow-up dialogue. Artificial Intelligence (AI) in this form is generative; it can create content such as audio, code, images, text and videos – many of the … Continue reading “ChatGPT in education: how much work should we outsource to AI?”

Closing The Gender Pay Gap: Are we nearly there now in 2023?

By Professor Fiona Carmichael, Professor Scott Taylor and Dr Marco Ercolani, Birmingham Business School Workplace gender inequality is a global phenomenon. The Gender Pay Gap (GPG), measuring the difference between men’s and women’s mean or median [1] wages, is the most evident and direct manifestation of gender inequality. The persistence of such a basic problem … Continue reading “Closing The Gender Pay Gap: Are we nearly there now in 2023?”

Russia’s War on Ukraine: What can we learn from Europe’s other conflicts?

By Dr Nicholas Barker and Dr George Kyris, Department of Political Science and International Studies It’s a year since Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine and almost nine years since the illegal annexation of Crimea and the start of the war in the Donbas. As analysts and policy-makers try to understand and respond to the war, … Continue reading “Russia’s War on Ukraine: What can we learn from Europe’s other conflicts?”

Peaky Blinders and the fashionable flat cap: looking sharp?

By Jemma Saunders, Department of Film and Creative Writing The West Midlands has long been overlooked in film and television, but last year was a significant year for Birmingham on screen. The final series of Peaky Blinders was broadcast from February to April, while summer saw the city host the 2022 Commonwealth Games. Although a … Continue reading “Peaky Blinders and the fashionable flat cap: looking sharp?”

The toxic influence of Andrew Tate: How society has failed a generation of young men and boys

By Dr Sophie King-Hill, Senior Fellow, Health Services Management Centre and David Russell, Community Safety & Justice Manager Andrew Tate is not far from the news at the moment. Although the online influencer claims to support males in negotiating society and bettering themselves, his ideologies are underpinned by dangerous and extreme misogyny. On face value … Continue reading “The toxic influence of Andrew Tate: How society has failed a generation of young men and boys”

Factivism: The Vital Link Between News Literacy and Youth Civic Engagement

By Professor Tom Harrison, School of Education It is a commonly heard lament that democratic discourse is in decline. This concern is not just expressed in the UK but also in many countries around the world. Evidence of this growing political division and animosity includes diminished trust in democratic institutions, decreased participation in the political … Continue reading “Factivism: The Vital Link Between News Literacy and Youth Civic Engagement”