Could a census campaign help to reverse Brexit? Don’t count on it.

By Dr Laurence Cooley, School of Government, University of Birmingham. With the decennial census of England and Wales scheduled for Sunday 21 March, a growing number of dissatisfied EU referendum ‘remain’ voters are taking to social media to declare their intention to answer the question on national identity by writing in ‘European’. These posts have … Continue reading “Could a census campaign help to reverse Brexit? Don’t count on it.”

President Biden’s first 100 days

By Christopher Featherstone, Doctoral Researcher, POLSIS, School of Government, University of Birmingham. President Biden’s path to his inauguration was very rocky and made history for the wrong reasons. Now he has made it to the White House, he faces more challenges, particularly in his first 100 days. COVID-19 No President wants to enter office during … Continue reading “President Biden’s first 100 days”

Brexit Uncertainty and EU Migrants

  By Dr Kelly Hall, Senior Lecturer in Social Policy and Professor Jenny Phillimore, Professor of Migration and Superdiversity School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham Brexit has undoubtedly created a huge amount of anxiety and uncertainty for EU migrants, with their rights to reside, run a business or access welfare placed under threat. Brexit … Continue reading “Brexit Uncertainty and EU Migrants”

When is it Virtue Signalling, and when is it just doing the right thing?

By Aidan Thompson, School of Education, University of Birmingham. I am on my fourth edit of this blog, such has been the changing nature of the story of Marcus Rashford challenging the government to improve its provision of free school meals for children from underprivileged and low socio-economic backgrounds. I began writing this just after … Continue reading “When is it Virtue Signalling, and when is it just doing the right thing?”

Sustainable support for families experiencing food insecurity

By Dr Anita Soni and Megan Tucker School of Education, University of Birmingham. When Covid-19 was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization back in March, the focus was on health: how the virus would affect people, how hospitals would cope with an influx of patients needing specialist care, how healthcare workers could … Continue reading “Sustainable support for families experiencing food insecurity”

Are we Heading towards a Cash-less or Cash-more Society?

By Dr Inci Toral & Professor Ronan de Kervenoael,  Department of Marketing, University of Birmingham The use of alternative payment service technologies is an old notion dating back to early 20th century. Western Union bank began issuing charge cards (bills to be paid in full in each statement) from its most loyal customers as a … Continue reading “Are we Heading towards a Cash-less or Cash-more Society?”

“No room for equivocation”: Labour, antisemitism and the discourse of denial

By Dr Alex Oaten, Teaching Fellow in Political Sciences School of Government, University of Birmingham. The Equality and Human Rights Commission’s (EHRC) report into antisemitism within the Labour Party has caused significant political ramifications. The party has been found to have “breached the Equality Act 2010 by committing unlawful harassment through the acts of its … Continue reading ““No room for equivocation”: Labour, antisemitism and the discourse of denial”

An expanded conservative majority on the US Supreme Court – what does it mean?

By Dr Adam Quinn, Senior Lecturer in American and International Politics School of Government, University of Birmingham. The death of US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 18th generated a wave of grief from her many admirers – especially young women – followed by fear on the part of liberals regarding the likely … Continue reading “An expanded conservative majority on the US Supreme Court – what does it mean?”

Speaking Truth to Power: How Extinction Rebellion have lost their way

By Dr Alex Oaten, Department of Political Science and International Studies School of Government, University of Birmingham The recent wave of protests organised by the movement Extinction Rebellion (XR) has succeeded in drawing significant attention to the environmental degradation that has become a feature of the modern world. With the government seemingly unwilling to take … Continue reading “Speaking Truth to Power: How Extinction Rebellion have lost their way”

The 2019 spending review and the implications for the NHS

By Judith Smith, Professor of Health Policy and Management and Director of Health Services Management Centre School of Social Policy, University of Birmingham The announcement today of a 3.1 percent real-terms increase in the resource budget of the Department for Health and Social Care is a helpful confirmation of funding uplifts promised for by former … Continue reading “The 2019 spending review and the implications for the NHS”