Good Girls VS Bad Girls: exploring the representations of female sexuality on ITV’s Love Island

By Amelia Morris,  Doctoral Researcher Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Birmingham Overall, it is important to analyse reality TV’s representations of femininity and sexuality; shows such as Love Island exist within the mainstream and draw in large audiences.  Thus, conversations surrounding gender and sexuality can be amplified through such shows in a … Continue reading “Good Girls VS Bad Girls: exploring the representations of female sexuality on ITV’s Love Island”

Why do people volunteer for international development organisations?

By David Hudson, Professorial Research Fellow in Politics and Development International Development Department, University of Birmingham Who are these people who give their time, and work with and for international development organisations? People become engaged with international development in lots of different ways and for many different reasons. Some people donate to a charity because … Continue reading “Why do people volunteer for international development organisations?”

The persistence of white privilege in higher education: isn’t it time for radical change?

By Kalwant Bhopal, Professor of Education and Social Justice Centre for Research in Race and Education, University of Birmingham Yesterday it was reported in The Guardian that Oxford University has yet again failed to address issues of diversity and inclusion in terms of its student intake. The Guardian reports that one in four Oxford colleges … Continue reading “The persistence of white privilege in higher education: isn’t it time for radical change?”

Taking responsibility for our prisons: lessons to be learnt from Norway

By Dr Anna Kotova, Lecturer in Criminology Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology, University of Birmingham Only about 25% of former prisoners in England and Wales are in employment after release, as per the government’s 2016 figures [ii]. About half of employers would not consider employing someone who had been to prison [iii]. In a recent … Continue reading “Taking responsibility for our prisons: lessons to be learnt from Norway”

Thoughts on the Foster Care Review

By Simon Haworth, Teaching Fellow Department of Social Care and Social Work, University of Birmingham In aid of Foster Care Fortnight (14 May-27 May) this post focuses on the recent review of foster care in England. The post could have concentrated on a variety of topics related to fostering, in fact I had even considered commenting … Continue reading “Thoughts on the Foster Care Review”

VIDEO: All things considered, is the world really such a bad place?

In this exciting new video series, researchers from the College of Social Sciences sit down over a cuppa and tackle some of the big issues which impact today’s society. If you pay attention to the headlines, you are likely to conclude that life doesn’t seem so great. In the last few years, we have seen … Continue reading “VIDEO: All things considered, is the world really such a bad place?”

Mental Health Awareness Week: address your stress

By Maureen Smojkis, Lecturer in Mental Health Department of Social Work and Social Care, University of Birmingham Mental Health Awareness Week (14-20 May 2018) is co-ordinated by the Mental Health Foundation to tackle the stigma that is often associated with mental health conditions. Mental health is a topic that has become more visible over the past decade, … Continue reading “Mental Health Awareness Week: address your stress”

A remarkable life: The longevity of the National Assistance Act

By Allan Norman, Associate Lecturer in Social Work Law, University of Birmingham Social Worker, Non-practising solicitor “The existing poor law shall cease to have effect.” With these opening words, the National Assistance Act 1948 dramatically brought about the end of an era, sweeping away the last vestiges of a Victorian scheme that had held on … Continue reading “A remarkable life: The longevity of the National Assistance Act”

The National Assistance Act 70 years on – Lessons for the social care green paper

By Catherine Needham, Professor of Public Policy and Public Management Health Services Management Centre, University of Birmingham As the weight of expectations builds on the forthcoming social care green paper, it is timely that this week is the 70th anniversary of the National Assistance Act 1948 which created social services in their current form. The … Continue reading “The National Assistance Act 70 years on – Lessons for the social care green paper”

A little less ‘Ego’ and a little more humility

By Dr Catherine Darnell, Research Fellow Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, University of Birmingham The antidote for egotism may therefore be a humble one; rather than deny our limitations, take ownership of them, seek ways to improve them, listen to different points of view, acknowledge alternative conclusions and be ready to repeat this all again. … Continue reading “A little less ‘Ego’ and a little more humility”