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Finding the biting point: Desire and biting males in Dickens’s ‘The Pickwick Papers’ and ‘The Old Curiosity Shop’

In this guest post, Colette Ramuz (Royal Holloway) explores textual patterns related to the mouth in a subsection of the CLiC corpus of Dickens’s Novels. She argues that the use of digital tools can help advance our understanding of Dickens’s representations of embodiment and sexuality. It is a commonplace that sexuality was considered a taboo topic … Continue reading “Finding the biting point: Desire and biting males in Dickens’s ‘The Pickwick Papers’ and ‘The Old Curiosity Shop’”

31 August 2018 by
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Distance-reading the feminine landscapes of The Awakening

In this guest post, Heather Froehlich, Digital Scholarship Fellow in Text Analysis and Assistant Librarian at Pennsylvania State University, shows that digital humanities is not all about big data but can also provide useful insights on a smaller scale. She demonstrates this with a case study of Kate Chopin’s novella The Awakening. One thing we digital … Continue reading “Distance-reading the feminine landscapes of The Awakening”

29 June 2018 by
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Signposting and gatekeeping the supernatural: Servants and doors in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

In this guest post teacher Claire Stoneman shares her passion for Victorian literature with a case study of servants and agency in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. She emphasises the role of doors in this context – reiterating the importance of doors in this novella, which our Blog readers may remember from Lorraine … Continue reading “Signposting and gatekeeping the supernatural: Servants and doors in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”

8 June 2018 by
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On Kitchens, Keywords, Key Clusters, and Concordances: Re-examining Eating and Drinking in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights

Maya Sfeir (@mmsfeir on Twitter)  is a Lecturer based in Beirut, Lebanon. Her research interests focus on examining and understanding the literary-linguistic interface. Her blog post was inspired by a conversation about Emily Brontë and anorexia that she had with one of the attendees of the Corpus Linguistics Summer School held at the University of … Continue reading “On Kitchens, Keywords, Key Clusters, and Concordances: Re-examining Eating and Drinking in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights”

18 May 2018 by
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CLiC to subscribe: Babel is pleased to support the CLiC project

Dan McIntyre (@danguage on Twitter) is Professor of English Language and Linguistics at the University of Huddersfield and one of the editors of the hugely popular Babel: The Language Magazine. He is also a member of the CLiC Advisory Panel and a keen supporter of the CLiC project. Dan’s research interests include corpus linguistics, stylistics, … Continue reading “CLiC to subscribe: Babel is pleased to support the CLiC project”

4 May 2018 by
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Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace

Emma Curry (@EmmaLCurry on Twitter) completed her PhD thesis, titled “Language and the Fragmented Body in the Novels of Charles Dickens”, in 2016 at Birkbeck, University of London. Her research interests include Dickens, nineteenth-century fiction, digital humanities, the body in literature, and the history of emotions. During her time at Birkbeck she spearheaded the ‘Our Mutual Friend Tweets‘ project, … Continue reading “Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace”

12 April 2018 by
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What’s in a Word: Exam-ready with CLiC

Kat Howard (@SaysMiss on Twitter) is an English teacher at Brockington College, an 11-16 Secondary School in South Leicestershire. Previously undertaking roles such as Literacy Coordinator and overseeing KS3 Curriculum Planning and Assessment, Kat provided T&L training through the National College of Teaching and Leadership and has written resourcing content for a range of providers … Continue reading “What’s in a Word: Exam-ready with CLiC”

27 March 2018 by
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‘High prices, big posters, and great confidence … Town very much excited on the subject’: Charles Dickens on the Birmingham stage in 1848

Martin Killeen is Head of Rare Books at the Cadbury Research Library. Thanks to his specialism, he has a unique insight into the resources of the library’s collection. In this post, based on the library’s Dickens holdings (including an original manuscript playbill and ticket for the event), Martin traces how the novelist came to put … Continue reading “‘High prices, big posters, and great confidence … Town very much excited on the subject’: Charles Dickens on the Birmingham stage in 1848”

13 March 2018 by