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‘By the Sweat of their Brows’ or How Characters (Don’t) Sweat in Nineteenth-Century Fiction

Maya Sfeir is a Lecturer based in Beirut, Lebanon. Her research interests focus on examining and understanding the literary-linguistic interface. In this blog post, she explores how sweat is represented in Victorian fiction by examining two CLiC sub-corpora, 19C and DNov. Her previous contribution to CLiC,‘On Kitchens, Keywords, Key Clusters, and Concordances…’, re-examined eating and … Continue reading “‘By the Sweat of their Brows’ or How Characters (Don’t) Sweat in Nineteenth-Century Fiction”

27 June 2022 by
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‘The Gumption I Write With’: The Chaotic Journals of (Neo)Victorian Characters

Nat Reeve is a novelist and AHRC-funded PhD candidate at Royal Holloway, University of London. Their debut novel, Nettleblack, is out June 23rd 2022 with Cipher Press, with a sequel forthcoming in 2023. Nat’s PhD project is a queer reading of Elizabeth Siddal’s art and poetry, featuring unruly Books of Hours, tree-person hybrids, sapphic musicians … Continue reading “‘The Gumption I Write With’: The Chaotic Journals of (Neo)Victorian Characters”

13 June 2022 by
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Using CLiC and the BMI resources: Restrictions of passion and effects of convention in Hard Times

Following her previous post on using CLiC and BMI (Birmingham & Midland Institute) resources with A Level students, Alex Round steps into her role as a researcher of 19th century literature to discuss the themes of passion, convention and education in Dickens’s Hard Times, and reflect on the educational role of the BMI. This post … Continue reading “Using CLiC and the BMI resources: Restrictions of passion and effects of convention in Hard Times”

21 July 2020 by
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Bringing Dickens to the Stage. Part Two: Dickens’ performing career

This is the second post of the mini-series “Bringing Dickens to the Stage”, in which actor Gerald Dickens (@DickensShows on Twitter) recounts his personal connection with the works of his great great grandfather, Charles Dickens. The post is brought to you as part of the BMI Lockdown Life initiative, in collaboration with the Birmingham & Midland Institute. Join the conversation … Continue reading “Bringing Dickens to the Stage. Part Two: Dickens’ performing career”

24 June 2020 by
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Looking through the windows in Stoker’s Dracula

In this post, Marta Palandri (@hardlyanitgirl on Twitter) discusses the symbolism of windows, light and darkness in Bram Stoker’s Dracula. This post is part of the BMI Lockdown Life series, published in collaboration with the Birmingham & Midland Institute blog. Join the conversation at #BMILockDownLife. “They simply seemed to fade into the rays of the … Continue reading “Looking through the windows in Stoker’s Dracula”

20 June 2020 by
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Bringing Dickens to the Stage. Part One: A Christmas Carol

In the anniversary week of Charles Dickens’s death, 150 years ago, we are delighted to present you a personal view of Charles Dickens by his great great grandson Gerald Dickens (@DickensShows on Twitter). This post is brought to you as part of the BMI Lockdown Life initiative, in collaboration with the Birmingham & Midland Institute. … Continue reading “Bringing Dickens to the Stage. Part One: A Christmas Carol”

10 June 2020 by
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A Christmas Carol: A secular or religious text?

In this post, Mary Hind-Portley (@Lit_Liverbird) explains how she teaches Dickens’s Christmas Carol with a focus on its religious elements. The post is based on Mary’s remote CPD presentation and a previous blogpost for @LitdriveUK (https://litdrive.org.uk/). The full set of Mary’s slides shown throughout the post is available here [PDF, 6.1MB]. You can follow Mary … Continue reading “A Christmas Carol: A secular or religious text?”

9 June 2020 by
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“Mew says the cat…Bow-wow-wow says the dog”: Which animal did Dickens prefer?

In this post for the “BMI lockdown life” series, Lydia Craig (@lydiaecraig on Twitter) of the Loyola University Chicago delights us with more insights about Charles Dickens, the 16th president of the BMI. Lydia is co-organizer of the upcoming #Dickens150 virtual conference on 9 June. If you want to join this day of virtual talks … Continue reading ““Mew says the cat…Bow-wow-wow says the dog”: Which animal did Dickens prefer?”

25 May 2020 by