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Inspiration for corpus linguistics and stylistics: #dhmasterclass

This post reflects on the Digital Humanities Masterclass 2018 (#DHMasterclass) in which I participated at the German Historical Institute in Paris. [There’s an institute like this in London as well, by the way!] The masterclass was meant to bring together researchers working with digital tools and historical materials (particularly with autobiographical sources) from France and Germany … Continue reading “Inspiration for corpus linguistics and stylistics: #dhmasterclass”

9 November 2018 by
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Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace

Emma Curry (@EmmaLCurry on Twitter) completed her PhD thesis, titled “Language and the Fragmented Body in the Novels of Charles Dickens”, in 2016 at Birkbeck, University of London. Her research interests include Dickens, nineteenth-century fiction, digital humanities, the body in literature, and the history of emotions. During her time at Birkbeck she spearheaded the ‘Our Mutual Friend Tweets‘ project, … Continue reading “Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace”

12 April 2018 by
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CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (#SIG_DLS)

We are very pleased to announce a CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (also see the Twitter hashtag #SIG_DLS), which is curated by J. Berenike Herrmann (@Jberenike on Twitter) at the University of Basel’s Digital Humanities Lab. This special interest group brings together researchers from different perspectives … Continue reading “CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (#SIG_DLS)”

26 March 2018 by
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Dickens and the History of Literary and Linguistic Computing – a (very) short retrospective

Martin Wynne (@MartinJWynne on Twitter) is a digital research specialist at the University of Oxford. Martin is based in the Bodleian Libraries, where he is responsible for the Oxford Text Archive, which also involves managing the distribution of the British National Corpus (BNC). From almost the very beginning of the digital era, people have used computers to help them to … Continue reading “Dickens and the History of Literary and Linguistic Computing – a (very) short retrospective”

6 February 2018 by
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Video: Introducing the CLiC KWICGrouper function to group concordance lines

In May 2017 the CLiC web app was updated with a new function in the ‘Concordance’ tab: the KWICGrouper. The concordance is a basic display format in corpus linguistics. It is also a powerful tool in revealing language patterns that are not visible in running text, or in Sinclair’s famous words: “The language looks rather … Continue reading “Video: Introducing the CLiC KWICGrouper function to group concordance lines”

22 June 2017 by
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CLiC teacher workshop: “Corpus stylistics for the English classroom”

On 16 June 2017, the CLiC Dickens team organised a workshop for teachers: “Corpus stylistics for the English classroom”. This workshop was attended by both secondary and tertiary level English teachers. Dr Marcello Giovanelli (Aston University) opened the workshop with a talk on “Opportunities for Lang-Lit work in Secondary English”. The majority of the workshop … Continue reading “CLiC teacher workshop: “Corpus stylistics for the English classroom””

21 June 2017 by