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Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace

Emma Curry (@EmmaLCurry on Twitter) completed her PhD thesis, titled “Language and the Fragmented Body in the Novels of Charles Dickens”, in 2016 at Birkbeck, University of London. Her research interests include Dickens, nineteenth-century fiction, digital humanities, the body in literature, and the history of emotions. During her time at Birkbeck she spearheaded the ‘Our Mutual Friend Tweets‘ project, … Continue reading “Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace”

12 April 2018 by
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CLiC in the classroom

Lorraine Adriano has taught in secondary schools in England and Italy. She was curriculum leader for KS3 and Head of Department, developing schemes of work and assessments. Lorraine now teaches English language and English literature  years 7-13 at Bishop Walsh Catholic Secondary School. She is an examiner for both English language and English literature at GSCE and is … Continue reading “CLiC in the classroom”

5 March 2018 by
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CLiC guest post on the ‘Programming Historian’ blog about the ‘fireplace pose’ in 19th century fiction

We are very pleased to announce a CLiC guest post on the PH blog, the blog accompanying the widely popular Programming Historian (PH) digital tutorials. In our guest post, we explain how the KWICGrouper feature in CLiC can be used to explore textual patterns that are shared across novels and point to socially and culturally relevant behaviours and … Continue reading “CLiC guest post on the ‘Programming Historian’ blog about the ‘fireplace pose’ in 19th century fiction”

22 September 2017 by
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Video: Introducing the CLiC KWICGrouper function to group concordance lines

In May 2017 the CLiC web app was updated with a new function in the ‘Concordance’ tab: the KWICGrouper. The concordance is a basic display format in corpus linguistics. It is also a powerful tool in revealing language patterns that are not visible in running text, or in Sinclair’s famous words: “The language looks rather … Continue reading “Video: Introducing the CLiC KWICGrouper function to group concordance lines”

22 June 2017 by