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‘By the Sweat of their Brows’ or How Characters (Don’t) Sweat in Nineteenth-Century Fiction

Maya Sfeir is a Lecturer based in Beirut, Lebanon. Her research interests focus on examining and understanding the literary-linguistic interface. In this blog post, she explores how sweat is represented in Victorian fiction by examining two CLiC sub-corpora, 19C and DNov. Her previous contribution to CLiC,‘On Kitchens, Keywords, Key Clusters, and Concordances…’, re-examined eating and … Continue reading “‘By the Sweat of their Brows’ or How Characters (Don’t) Sweat in Nineteenth-Century Fiction”

27 June 2022 by
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CLiC Quick-Start Guide

Dr Rosalind White takes you through a quick-start guide exploring some of CLiC’s features.  If you would prefer video instructions these instructions are available in a Twitter thread. You can also find further guidance on the help tab of the CLiC Web App. The CLiC Web App (Mahlberg et al. 2020) was designed specifically for the analysis … Continue reading “CLiC Quick-Start Guide”

15 June 2022 by
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‘The Gumption I Write With’: The Chaotic Journals of (Neo)Victorian Characters

Nat Reeve is a novelist and AHRC-funded PhD candidate at Royal Holloway, University of London. Their debut novel, Nettleblack, is out June 23rd 2022 with Cipher Press, with a sequel forthcoming in 2023. Nat’s PhD project is a queer reading of Elizabeth Siddal’s art and poetry, featuring unruly Books of Hours, tree-person hybrids, sapphic musicians … Continue reading “‘The Gumption I Write With’: The Chaotic Journals of (Neo)Victorian Characters”

13 June 2022 by
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‘I know no speck so troublesome as self’: Finding Middlemarch through Corpus Linguistics

Dr Rosalind White, (@DrRosalindWhite on Twitter) research associate at the University of Birmingham’s Centre for Corpus Research and on #FindingMiddlemarch at Royal Holloway, University of London, proposes a way into George Eliot’s Middlemarch using corpus linguistics. In this blog post, I’d like to explore how corpus linguistic tools can be used to illuminate the semantic texture of George … Continue reading “‘I know no speck so troublesome as self’: Finding Middlemarch through Corpus Linguistics”

4 April 2022 by
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Finding links between the structure and themes of A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol is a popular text choice for students in GCSE English Literature Section B (see the AQA Lead Examiner’s Report 2017). No wonder then, that it is also one of the top texts in our CLiC 2.0 web app for which teachers request activities. In fact, two teachers have previously written guest blog … Continue reading “Finding links between the structure and themes of A Christmas Carol”

17 May 2019 by
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“Hello darkness my old friend…”. Enacting silence through punctuation in Heart of Darkness

As suggested by the famous song by Simon and Garfunkel, darkness and silence often go together in our imagination. Conrad’s novel Heart of Darkness seems to be no exception. The to-and-fro movement from linguistic description to literary appreciation and interpretation is what traditional stylistics and  modern computer stylistics have in common, along with the assumption … Continue reading ““Hello darkness my old friend…”. Enacting silence through punctuation in Heart of Darkness”

18 January 2019 by
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Distance-reading the feminine landscapes of The Awakening

In this guest post, Heather Froehlich, Digital Scholarship Fellow in Text Analysis and Assistant Librarian at Pennsylvania State University, shows that digital humanities is not all about big data but can also provide useful insights on a smaller scale. She demonstrates this with a case study of Kate Chopin’s novella The Awakening. One thing we digital … Continue reading “Distance-reading the feminine landscapes of The Awakening”

29 June 2018 by
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Signposting and gatekeeping the supernatural: Servants and doors in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

In this guest post teacher Claire Stoneman shares her passion for Victorian literature with a case study of servants and agency in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. She emphasises the role of doors in this context – reiterating the importance of doors in this novella, which our Blog readers may remember from Lorraine … Continue reading “Signposting and gatekeeping the supernatural: Servants and doors in The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”

8 June 2018 by
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On Kitchens, Keywords, Key Clusters, and Concordances: Re-examining Eating and Drinking in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights

Maya Sfeir (@mmsfeir on Twitter)  is a Lecturer based in Beirut, Lebanon. Her research interests focus on examining and understanding the literary-linguistic interface. Her blog post was inspired by a conversation about Emily Brontë and anorexia that she had with one of the attendees of the Corpus Linguistics Summer School held at the University of … Continue reading “On Kitchens, Keywords, Key Clusters, and Concordances: Re-examining Eating and Drinking in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights”

18 May 2018 by