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“Hello darkness my old friend…”. Enacting silence through punctuation in Heart of Darkness

As suggested by the famous song by Simon and Garfunkel, darkness and silence often go together in our imagination. Conrad’s novel Heart of Darkness seems to be no exception. The to-and-fro movement from linguistic description to literary appreciation and interpretation is what traditional stylistics and  modern computer stylistics have in common, along with the assumption … Continue reading ““Hello darkness my old friend…”. Enacting silence through punctuation in Heart of Darkness”

18 January 2019 by
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Inspiration for corpus linguistics and stylistics: #dhmasterclass

This post reflects on the Digital Humanities Masterclass 2018 (#DHMasterclass) in which I participated at the German Historical Institute in Paris. [There’s an institute like this in London as well, by the way!] The masterclass was meant to bring together researchers working with digital tools and historical materials (particularly with autobiographical sources) from France and Germany … Continue reading “Inspiration for corpus linguistics and stylistics: #dhmasterclass”

9 November 2018 by
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Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace

Emma Curry (@EmmaLCurry on Twitter) completed her PhD thesis, titled “Language and the Fragmented Body in the Novels of Charles Dickens”, in 2016 at Birkbeck, University of London. Her research interests include Dickens, nineteenth-century fiction, digital humanities, the body in literature, and the history of emotions. During her time at Birkbeck she spearheaded the ‘Our Mutual Friend Tweets‘ project, … Continue reading “Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace”

12 April 2018 by
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CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (#SIG_DLS)

We are very pleased to announce a CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (also see the Twitter hashtag #SIG_DLS), which is curated by J. Berenike Herrmann (@Jberenike on Twitter) at the University of Basel’s Digital Humanities Lab. This special interest group brings together researchers from different perspectives … Continue reading “CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (#SIG_DLS)”

26 March 2018 by
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Is there light in the heart of darkness?

Lorenzo Mastropierro (@Lo_Mastropierro on Twitter) is a Teaching Associate in Literary Linguistics at the University of Nottingham. Lorenzo is the Assistant Editor for the International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. He has recently published his monograph Corpus Stylistics in Heart of Darkness and its Italian Translations. Now Heart of Darkness is also available in CLiC and … Continue reading “Is there light in the heart of darkness?”

20 February 2018 by
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CLiC and Dickens’s not-so-conspicuous techniques of characterisation: Reporting verbs

Pablo Ruano San Segundo (@pablo_uex on Twitter) is a Lecturer at the University of Extremadura, Spain. He is a member of the CLiC Dickens Advisory Board and is an expert on reporting verbs in Dickens’s novels. In this post Pablo shares how he uses CLiC in his research. The creation of Dickens’s most memorable characters … Continue reading “CLiC and Dickens’s not-so-conspicuous techniques of characterisation: Reporting verbs”

13 January 2018 by
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CLiC Dickens Day: our end-of-project celebration at the BMI

The AHRC-funded CLiC Dickens project has officially come to an end. We celebrated the successful conclusion of the project with our CLiC Dickens Day, at the Birmingham and Midland Institute (BMI), on 1 December. As Charles Dickens was one of the early presidents of the BMI, the venue was particularly suitable for our event. The … Continue reading “CLiC Dickens Day: our end-of-project celebration at the BMI”

6 December 2017 by
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Video: Professor Peter Stockwell discussing the interface of corpus stylistics and cognitive poetics

In this short video, Professor Peter Stockwell, CI on the CLiC Dickens project, discusses the opportunities of using corpus stylistic techniques to interrogate cognitive poetic insights. He gives the example of using corpus linguistic methods to identify textual evidence spread across a text for the cognitive poetic notion of ‘mind-modelling’. If you’re interested in this particular line … Continue reading “Video: Professor Peter Stockwell discussing the interface of corpus stylistics and cognitive poetics”

22 June 2017 by