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Nightwalking by Magic Lantern, Finding Your Inner Flaneur with Charles Dickens

Sauntering through London’s nocturnal neighbourhoods fuelled Charles Dickens’ imagination and provided him with ample material to people his fictional worlds. What can we learn from his immersive exploration of real-world urban landscapes? In the following activities we’ll take a step back in time using the CLiC Web App to journey through Victorian London via Dicken’s oeuvre. … Continue reading “Nightwalking by Magic Lantern, Finding Your Inner Flaneur with Charles Dickens”

24 November 2023 by
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#CLiCCreative Digital Research Resources for Writers of Neo-Victorian Historical Fiction

The research stage of novel writing can be time-consuming and challenging, but is essential if you want to write a believable and immersive historical story. This stage of the writing process doesn’t have to be daunting! Take a break from conventional fact-finding methods, and take a look at these digital resources that can help you … Continue reading “#CLiCCreative Digital Research Resources for Writers of Neo-Victorian Historical Fiction”

28 July 2023 by
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Using CLiC as a Creative Research Tool: Historical Ventriloquism

Ventriloquy is the art of speaking in such a way that one’s voice appears to come from another source. When it comes to writing believable dialogue, writers of historical fiction are a bit like ventriloquists. How can modern writers give the impression that their characters are conversing in the past? What research methods can we … Continue reading “Using CLiC as a Creative Research Tool: Historical Ventriloquism”

23 June 2023 by
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Using CLiC as a Creative Research Tool: Checking your Manuscript for Anachronisms

This post, penned by Dr Rosalind White (@DrRosalindWhite), will provide an overview of how our CLiC Web App can be used as an innovative historical research tool to cross-reference or verify historical details. This can help writers save time and energy, as well as quickly immerse them in the particulars of their preferred period. You … Continue reading “Using CLiC as a Creative Research Tool: Checking your Manuscript for Anachronisms”

30 May 2023 by
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Words of affection in George Eliot’s Middlemarch

Eleonora Gallitelli was awarded a PhD in Comparative Literature at IULM University, Milan, for a thesis on the early Italian translations of works by Dickens, Faulkner and Rushdie, where she combined the methodologies of corpus linguistics and close reading. In this post, she identifies the different meanings that the vocabulary of affection assumes for the … Continue reading “Words of affection in George Eliot’s Middlemarch”

23 November 2022 by
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Decadence and Debauchery: Undressing the Dandy Using the CLiC Web App

Tiffany Olgun is a PhD student at Royal Holloway, University of London, researching the Dickensian dandy. In this post, she explores the language surrounding nineteenth-century English dandyism and the progression of the dandy from his Regency incarnation to his decadent form. The nineteenth-century English dandy is often portrayed as a man of pure surface and … Continue reading “Decadence and Debauchery: Undressing the Dandy Using the CLiC Web App”

20 September 2022 by