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‘By the Sweat of their Brows’ or How Characters (Don’t) Sweat in Nineteenth-Century Fiction

Maya Sfeir is a Lecturer based in Beirut, Lebanon. Her research interests focus on examining and understanding the literary-linguistic interface. In this blog post, she explores how sweat is represented in Victorian fiction by examining two CLiC sub-corpora, 19C and DNov. Her previous contribution to CLiC,‘On Kitchens, Keywords, Key Clusters, and Concordances…’, re-examined eating and … Continue reading “‘By the Sweat of their Brows’ or How Characters (Don’t) Sweat in Nineteenth-Century Fiction”

27 June 2022 by
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CLiC Quick-Start Guide

Dr Rosalind White takes you through a quick-start guide exploring some of CLiC’s features.  If you would prefer video instructions these instructions are available in a Twitter thread. You can also find further guidance on the help tab of the CLiC Web App. The CLiC Web App (Mahlberg et al. 2020) was designed specifically for the analysis … Continue reading “CLiC Quick-Start Guide”

15 June 2022 by
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‘The Gumption I Write With’: The Chaotic Journals of (Neo)Victorian Characters

Nat Reeve is a novelist and AHRC-funded PhD candidate at Royal Holloway, University of London. Their debut novel, Nettleblack, is out June 23rd 2022 with Cipher Press, with a sequel forthcoming in 2023. Nat’s PhD project is a queer reading of Elizabeth Siddal’s art and poetry, featuring unruly Books of Hours, tree-person hybrids, sapphic musicians … Continue reading “‘The Gumption I Write With’: The Chaotic Journals of (Neo)Victorian Characters”

13 June 2022 by
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‘I know no speck so troublesome as self’: Finding Middlemarch through Corpus Linguistics

Dr Rosalind White, (@DrRosalindWhite on Twitter) research associate at the University of Birmingham’s Centre for Corpus Research and on #FindingMiddlemarch at Royal Holloway, University of London, proposes a way into George Eliot’s Middlemarch using corpus linguistics. In this blog post, I’d like to explore how corpus linguistic tools can be used to illuminate the semantic texture of George … Continue reading “‘I know no speck so troublesome as self’: Finding Middlemarch through Corpus Linguistics”

4 April 2022 by
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“Hello darkness my old friend…”. Enacting silence through punctuation in Heart of Darkness

As suggested by the famous song by Simon and Garfunkel, darkness and silence often go together in our imagination. Conrad’s novel Heart of Darkness seems to be no exception. The to-and-fro movement from linguistic description to literary appreciation and interpretation is what traditional stylistics and  modern computer stylistics have in common, along with the assumption … Continue reading ““Hello darkness my old friend…”. Enacting silence through punctuation in Heart of Darkness”

18 January 2019 by
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Inspiration for corpus linguistics and stylistics: #dhmasterclass

This post reflects on the Digital Humanities Masterclass 2018 (#DHMasterclass) in which I participated at the German Historical Institute in Paris. [There’s an institute like this in London as well, by the way!] The masterclass was meant to bring together researchers working with digital tools and historical materials (particularly with autobiographical sources) from France and Germany … Continue reading “Inspiration for corpus linguistics and stylistics: #dhmasterclass”

9 November 2018 by
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Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace

Emma Curry (@EmmaLCurry on Twitter) completed her PhD thesis, titled “Language and the Fragmented Body in the Novels of Charles Dickens”, in 2016 at Birkbeck, University of London. Her research interests include Dickens, nineteenth-century fiction, digital humanities, the body in literature, and the history of emotions. During her time at Birkbeck she spearheaded the ‘Our Mutual Friend Tweets‘ project, … Continue reading “Dickens, Wooden Legs and the Dickensian Cyberspace”

12 April 2018 by
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CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (#SIG_DLS)

We are very pleased to announce a CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (also see the Twitter hashtag #SIG_DLS), which is curated by J. Berenike Herrmann (@Jberenike on Twitter) at the University of Basel’s Digital Humanities Lab. This special interest group brings together researchers from different perspectives … Continue reading “CLiC guest post on the Blog of the Digital Literary Stylistics Special Interest Group (#SIG_DLS)”

26 March 2018 by
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Is there light in the heart of darkness?

Lorenzo Mastropierro (@Lo_Mastropierro on Twitter) is a Teaching Associate in Literary Linguistics at the University of Nottingham. Lorenzo is the Assistant Editor for the International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. He has recently published his monograph Corpus Stylistics in Heart of Darkness and its Italian Translations. Now Heart of Darkness is also available in CLiC and … Continue reading “Is there light in the heart of darkness?”

20 February 2018 by
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CLiC and Dickens’s not-so-conspicuous techniques of characterisation: Reporting verbs

Pablo Ruano San Segundo (@pablo_uex on Twitter) is a Lecturer at the University of Extremadura, Spain. He is a member of the CLiC Dickens Advisory Board and is an expert on reporting verbs in Dickens’s novels. In this post Pablo shares how he uses CLiC in his research. The creation of Dickens’s most memorable characters … Continue reading “CLiC and Dickens’s not-so-conspicuous techniques of characterisation: Reporting verbs”

13 January 2018 by