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Is there light in the heart of darkness?

Lorenzo Mastropierro (@Lo_Mastropierro on Twitter) is a Teaching Associate in Literary Linguistics at the University of Nottingham. Lorenzo is the Assistant Editor for the International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. He has recently published his monograph Corpus Stylistics in Heart of Darkness and its Italian Translations. Now Heart of Darkness is also available in CLiC and … Continue reading “Is there light in the heart of darkness?”

20 February 2018 by
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Dickens and the History of Literary and Linguistic Computing – a (very) short retrospective

Martin Wynne (@MartinJWynne on Twitter) is a digital research specialist at the University of Oxford. Martin is based in the Bodleian Libraries, where he is responsible for the Oxford Text Archive, which also involves managing the distribution of the British National Corpus (BNC). From almost the very beginning of the digital era, people have used computers to help them to … Continue reading “Dickens and the History of Literary and Linguistic Computing – a (very) short retrospective”

6 February 2018 by
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CLiC and Dickens’s not-so-conspicuous techniques of characterisation: Reporting verbs

Pablo Ruano San Segundo (@pablo_uex on Twitter) is a Lecturer at the University of Extremadura, Spain. He is a member of the CLiC Dickens Advisory Board and is an expert on reporting verbs in Dickens’s novels. In this post Pablo shares how he uses CLiC in his research. The creation of Dickens’s most memorable characters … Continue reading “CLiC and Dickens’s not-so-conspicuous techniques of characterisation: Reporting verbs”

13 January 2018 by
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CLiC guest post on the ‘Programming Historian’ blog about the ‘fireplace pose’ in 19th century fiction

We are very pleased to announce a CLiC guest post on the PH blog, the blog accompanying the widely popular Programming Historian (PH) digital tutorials. In our guest post, we explain how the KWICGrouper feature in CLiC can be used to explore textual patterns that are shared across novels and point to socially and culturally relevant behaviours and … Continue reading “CLiC guest post on the ‘Programming Historian’ blog about the ‘fireplace pose’ in 19th century fiction”

22 September 2017 by
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Video: Introducing the CLiC KWICGrouper function to group concordance lines

In May 2017 the CLiC web app was updated with a new function in the ‘Concordance’ tab: the KWICGrouper. The concordance is a basic display format in corpus linguistics. It is also a powerful tool in revealing language patterns that are not visible in running text, or in Sinclair’s famous words: “The language looks rather … Continue reading “Video: Introducing the CLiC KWICGrouper function to group concordance lines”

22 June 2017 by